Secure Communication with Nonlinear Time-Reversal: This figure demonstrates secure communication of two different UMD images using nonlinear time-reversal of electromagnetic waves (signals); each sent through a complicated wave scattering environment (brown box in the middle). The black boxes represent time-reversed signals that are not reconstructed after being scattered” title=”Secure Communication with Nonlinear Time-Reversal: This figure demonstrates secure communication of two different UMD images using nonlinear time-reversal of electromagnetic waves (signals); each sent through a complicated wave scattering environment (brown box in the middle). The black boxes represent time-reversed signals that are not reconstructed after being scattered.

Time reversal findings may open doors to the future

February 21, 2013 by Evelyn Rabil

(Phys.org)—Imagine a cell phone charger that recharges your phone remotely without even knowing where it is; a device that targets and destroys tumors, wherever they are in the body; or a security field that can disable electronics, even a listening device hiding in a prosthetic toe, without knowing where it is.

While these applications remain only dreams, researchers at the University of Maryland have come up with a sci-fi seeming technology that one day could make them real. Using a time-reversal technique, the team has discovered how to transmit power, sound or images to a nonlinear object without knowing the object’s exact location and without affecting objects around it. Their work, “Nonlinear Time Reversal in a Wave Chaotic System,” was published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Physical Review Letters journal.

“That’s the magic of time reversal,” says Steven Anlage, a university physics professor involved in the project. “When you reverse the waveform’s direction in space and time, it follows the same path it took coming out and finds its way exactly back to the source.”

Read more: Time reversal findings may open doors to the future — phys.org.

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