Scanning electron microscopy image of cubic NaO2 particles on
the cathode after cell discharge. Image credit: P. Hartmann

Sodium-air battery offers rechargeable advantages compared to Li-air batteries

January 2, 2013 by Lisa Zyga

(Phys.org)—Over the past few years, Li-air batteries (more precisely, Li-oxygen batteries) have become attractive due to their theoretical ability to store nearly as much energy per volume as gasoline. The key to this high energy density is the “air” part, since the batteries capture atmospheric oxygen to use in the cathode reaction instead of storing their own oxidizing agent. However, Li-air batteries have conventionally been single-use cells since they cannot be recharged, which significantly limits their applications. Now in a new study, scientists have found that replacing the lithium anode with a sodium anode may offer an unexpected path toward making metal-air batteries rechargeable while still offering a relatively high energy density.

Read more: Sodium-air battery offers rechargeable advantages compared to Li-air batteries — phys.org.

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