With a novel device, a UD professor is bringing access to previously untapped higher frequency bandwidth.

Professor brings access to previously untapped higher frequency bandwidth

February 19, 2013 by Karen B. Roberts

Society’s increasing technology use and data consumption is causing an information bottleneck, congesting airwave frequencies and sending engineers searching for access to higher capacity bandwidths.

Mature technologies, such as radio, operate at lower frequency ranges—for example the 88 to 108 megahertz on the FM radio dial—because it’s easy to manipulate. Communications become difficult at larger bandwidths.

For the military, which previously operated radar or communications systems at lower frequencies, finding a way to access these higher frequencies is imperative because civilian networks are increasingly crowded. Until now, no technology has existed to tap into and successfully use these frequencies, which span 30-100 gigahertz.

“It’s like having a highway where you can drive 1,000 miles per hour, but there aren’t any cars that go that fast,” says Dennis Prather, College of Engineering Alumni Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Prather says he and his team have created a “novel device that opens access to this new bandwidth.”

Read more: Professor brings access to previously untapped higher frequency bandwidth — phys.org.

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