This 3D graph shows the relationship between three different velocities: v, u and U, where v is the velocity of a second observer measured by a first observer, u is the velocity of a moving particle measured by the second observer, and U is the relative velocity of the particle to the first observer. Image credit: Hill and Cox. ©2012 The Royal Society

Physicists extend special relativity beyond the speed of light

October 8, 2012 by Lisa Zyga

(Phys.org)—Possibly the most well-known consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity is that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light, c. According to the mass-energy equivalence formula E = mc2, an object traveling at c would have infinite mass and would require an infinite amount of energy to reach c. Over the past 100 years, numerous experimental tests of special relativity have confirmed its validity.

Now two physicists – James Hill and Barry Cox from the University of Adelaide in Australia – have shown that Einstein’s theory of special relativity can be logically extended to allow for faster-than-light motion. They’re quick to point out that their finding in no way contradicts the original theory, but simply provides a new aspect of it.

Read more: Physicists extend special relativity beyond the speed of light — phys.org.

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