An artificial atomic nucleus made up of five charged calcium
dimers is centered in an atomic-collapse electron cloud.
(Credit: Michael Crommie, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

 

Long Predicted Atomic Collapse State Observed in Graphene

Mar. 7, 2013 — The first experimental observation of a quantum mechanical phenomenon that was predicted nearly 70 years ago holds important implications for the future of graphene-based electronic devices. Working with microscopic artificial atomic nuclei fabricated on graphene, a collaboration of researchers led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley have imaged the “atomic collapse” states theorized to occur around super-large atomic nuclei.

“Atomic collapse is one of the holy grails of graphene research, as well as a holy grail of atomic and nuclear physics,” says Michael Crommie, a physicist who holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and UC Berkeley’s Physics Department. “While this work represents a very nice confirmation of basic relativistic quantum mechanics predictions made many decades ago, it is also highly relevant for future nanoscale devices where electrical charge is concentrated into very small areas.”

Read more: Long predicted atomic collapse state observed in graphene — Science Daily.

Home           Top of page