PhD students James Colless and Alice Mahoney preparing a dilution refrigerator
for experiments on quantum dots. Temperatures close to absolute zero are
required to study the quantum behaviour.

Listening to electrons: New method brings scaling-up quantum devices one step closer

February 1, 2013

(Phys.org)—We’re now one step closer to quantum computing becoming a reality thanks to research led by a team of University of Sydney physicists, who have found a new way to detect changes in charges smaller than one electron.

The research is published in this week’s edition of Physical Review Letters.

“Our new method for detecting charge in quantum systems is exciting and has implications for a range of nanotechnologies,” said Associate Professor David Reilly, from the ARC Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney.

“We’ve been successful in finding a new, more convenient way to detect changes in charge of a single electron on quantum dots. Quantum dots are nanoscale systems that can confine or trap single electrons,” explained Associate Professor Reilly.

“Electrons confined to quantum dots are very nice systems for storing and manipulating quantum information, where data is encoded in the quantum mechanical aspects of the electron. Our goal is to scale-up a large number of quantum dots to ultimately create a machine to process quantum information – a quantum computer.”

Read more: Listening to electrons: New method brings scaling-up quantum devices one step closer — phys.org.

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