Liquid-processed SiLEDs: By changing the size of the silicon nanocrystals, color of the light emitted can be varied.
(Credit: F. Maier-Flaig, KIT/LTI)

Light from Silicon Nanocrystal LEDs: Scientists Develop Multicolor LEDs Without Heavy Metals

Feb. 22, 2013 — Silicon nanocrystals have a size of a few nanometers and possess a high luminous potential. Scientists of KIT and the University of Toronto/Canada have now succeeded in manufacturing silicon-based light-emitting diodes (SiLEDs). They are free of heavy metals and can emit light in various colors.

The team of chemists, materials researchers, nanoscientists, and opto-electronic experts presents its development in the journal Nano Letters.

Silicon dominates in microelectronics and photovoltaics industry, but has been considered unsuitable for light-emitting diodes for a long time. However, this is not true for nanoscopic dimensions: Minute silicon nanocrystals can produce light. These nanocrystals consist of a few hundred to thousand atoms and have a considerable potential as highly efficient light emitters, as was demonstrated by the team of Professor Uli Lemmer and Professor Annie K. Powell from KIT as well as Professor Geoffrey A. Ozin from the University of Toronto. In a joint project, the scientists have now succeeded in manufacturing highly efficient light-emitting diodes from the silicon nanocrystals.

Read more: Light from silicon nanocrystal LEDs: Scientists develop multicolor LEDs without heavy metals — Science Daily.

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