Wrecked ship. A new approach to invisibility
cloaking may one day be used at sea to shield
floating objects — such as oil rigs and ships
– from rough waves. Unlike most other cloaking
techniques that rely on transformation optics,
this one is based on the influence of the ocean
floor’s topography on the various “layers” of
ocean water. (Credit: © jo / Fotolia)



Invisibility Cloaking to Shield Floating Objects from Waves



ScienceDaily (Nov. 19, 2012) — A new approach to invisibility cloaking may one day be used at sea to shield floating objects — such as oil rigs and ships — from rough waves. Unlike most other cloaking techniques that rely on transformation optics, this one is based on the influence of the ocean floor’s topography on the various “layers” of ocean water.

At the American Physical Society’s (APS) Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD) meeting, being held November 18-20, 2012, in San Diego, Calif., Reza Alam, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, will describe how the variation of density in ocean water can be used to cloak floating objects against incident surface waves.

Read more: Invisibility cloaking to shield floating objects from waves — Science Daily.

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