This shows Dr. Nitin Tandon, University of Texas Health Science Center, operating to place electrodes on the brain of a patient. The electrodes record electrical activity in the brain and can be used both to monitor seizures and for research into memory by Arne Ekstrom at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience. Credit: Nitin Tandon, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston

In-brain monitoring shows memory network

January 29, 2013

Working with patients with electrodes implanted in their brains, researchers at the University of California, Davis, and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have shown for the first time that areas of the brain work together at the same time to recall memories. The unique approach promises new insights into how we remember details of time and place.

“Previous work has focused on one region of the brain at a time,” said Arne Ekstrom, assistant professor at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience. “Our results show that memory recall involves simultaneous activity across brain regions.” Ekstrom is senior author of a paper describing the work published Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Ekstrom and UC Davis graduate student Andrew Watrous worked with patients being treated for a severe seizure condition by neurosurgeon Dr. Nitin Tandon and his UTHealth colleagues.

To pinpoint the origin of the seizures in these patients, Tandon and his team place electrodes on the patient’s brain inside the skull. The electrodes remain in place for one to two weeks for monitoring.

Read more: In-brain monitoring shows memory network — Medical Xpress.

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