The external sound processor (top) and the actual implant,
that make up the Bone Conduction Implant

Implanted hearing aid uses bone conduction
to bypass defective middle ear

By Ben Coxworth
January 14, 2013

There may soon be help for people who have been rendered functionally deaf by problems of the middle ear. Researchers from Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology have developed an implant that bypasses the defective middle ear, transmitting sounds to the inner ear by sending vibrations right through the skull bone.

Developed by a team led by Prof. Bo Håkansson, the two-part Bone Conduction Implant (BCI) is intended mainly for use on “individuals who have been affected by chronic inflammation of the outer or middle ear, or bone disease, or who have congenital malformations of the outer ear, auditory canal or middle ear.” Regular hearing aids typically don’t work for such people, as they’re usually designed for dealing with problems of the inner ear.

The implant itself is a little less than six centimeters (2.4 inches) long, and is attached behind the ear, under the skin, directly into the surface of the skull.

Read more: Implanted hearing aid uses bone conduction to bypass defective middle ear — gizmag.

Home           Top of page