Halley VI, Britain’s latest and greatest Antarctic Research Station, has opened and will become fully operational over the coming weeks


The £25.8 million (US$40.6 million) facility was designed by Hugh Broughton Architects and engineering firm AECOM


Halley VI was constructed over four Antarctic summers


The northern platform features an observation lounge which will afford dramatic panoramic views of the landscape

Halley VI Antarctic research station opens for business

By Adam Williams
February 5, 2013

Just over a century after Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Antarctic expedition came to a tragic close, Britain’s latest and greatest Antarctic Research Station has opened and will become fully operational over the coming weeks. The £25.8 million (US$40.6 million) facility was designed by Hugh Broughton Architects and engineering firm AECOM, and represents a continued commitment from the UK’s scientific community to maintain a cutting-edge facility in the region.

In order to cope with the extreme conditions, which include prevailing winds of up to 90 mph (145 km/h) and an average external temperature of minus 30ºC (minus 22°F), Halley VI has been designed to be extremely rugged, and raised sufficiently high to stay above heavy annual snowfall.

Halley VI is mounted on what are essentially hydraulically-elevated skis. This allows the laboratory to be periodically towed by specialist bulldozers in order to avoid becoming stranded on an iceberg broken off from the floating Brunt Ice Shelf as it moves inexorably toward the sea at a rate of 400 meters (1,300 feet) per annum.

Read more: Halley VI Antarctic research station opens for business — gizmag.

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