A deep-fried space shuttle scallop built using Cornell’s Fab@Home 3-D food printer. Credit: Fab@Home


The Fab@Home 3-D food printer. Credit: Jeffrey Lipton


A 3-D food printer building turkey paste into blocks. Credit: Fab@Home

Feeding the Final Frontier: 3-D Printers Could Make Astronaut Meals

BY ADAM MANN
02.06.13
6:30 AM

Several decades from now, an astronaut in a Mars colony might feel a bit hungry. Rather than reach for a vacuum-sealed food packet or cook up some simple greenhouse vegetables in a tiny kitchen, the astronaut would visit a microwave-sized box, punch a few settings, and receive a delicious and nutritious meal tailored to his or her exact tastes.

This is the promise of the rapidly maturing field of 3-D food printing, an offshoot of the revolution that uses machines to build bespoke items out of metal, plastic, and even living cells. Sooner than you think, 3-D printed designer meals may be coming to a rocketship, or a restaurant, near you.

Read more: Feeding the Final Frontier: 3-D Printers Could Make Astronaut Meals | Wired Science | Wired.com.

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