McCormick researchers have designed a geometrically-patterned light scattering layer
that could make solar cells more efficient and less expensive.

Evolution inspires more efficient solar cell design: Geometric pattern maximizes time light is trapped in solar cell

January 25, 2013

(Phys.org)—The sun’s energy is virtually limitless, but harnessing its electricity with today’s single-crystal silicon solar cells is extremely expensive—10 times pricier than coal, according to some estimates. Organic solar cells—polymer solar cells that use organic materials to absorb light and convert it into electricity—could be a solution, but current designs suffer because polymers have less-than-optimal electrical properties.

Researchers at Northwestern University have now developed a new design for organic solar cells that could lead to more efficient, less expensive solar power. Instead of attempting to increase efficiency by altering the thickness of the solar cell’s polymer layer—a tactic that has preciously garnered mixed results—the researchers sought to design the geometric pattern of the scattering layer to maximize the amount of time light remained trapped within the cell.

Using a mathematical search algorithm based on natural evolution, the researchers pinpointed a specific geometrical pattern that is optimal for capturing and holding light in thin-cell organic solar cells.

Read more: Evolution inspires more efficient solar cell design: Geometric pattern maximizes time light is trapped in solar cell — phys.org.

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