Asteroids that are captured temporarily by Earth’s gravity have crazy orbits around us, because they’re pulled from all sides by the Earth, sun and moon. Image Credit: K. Teramuru, UH Ifa

EARTHSKY // FAQS // SPACE EarthSky JAN 16, 2013

Does Earth have a second moon?

Mars has two moons, Jupiter has 66, Saturn 62, Uranus 27, Neptune 13. But our planet Earth has just one moon. Doesn’t it?

Many planets in our solar system have more than one moon. Mars has two moons, Jupiter has 66, Saturn 62, Uranus 27, Neptune 13. Those numbers keep changing, and you can see a relatively current count of solar system moons here from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. But our planet Earth has just one moon. Doesn’t it?

Moons are defined as Earth’s natural satellites. They orbit around the Earth. And, in fact, although Earth sometimes has more than one moon, some objects you might have heard called Earth’s second moon aren’t, really. Let’s talk about some non-moons first.

Read more: Does Earth have a second moon? | Space | EarthSky.

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