Mastcam color image of turret shows the Honeybee rotating brushes at far right, and the pink looking dust cover for the MAHLI hand lens imager at center. Special adhesives holding clear cover and lenses below cause the glass to glow pink under certain lighting conditions. Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech

CuriousMars: Curiosity’s Critical Rock Drilling Target Selected as Opportunity Achieves Major Science Goal

By Craig Covault and A.J.S. Rayl
Posted January 10, 2013 3:57 PM

After weeks of searching, the Mars rover Curiosity’s science and engineering teams have selected a fine-grained slab of Martian rock as the candidate target for the first rock drilling on Mars, a significant first in planetary exploration.

Meanwhile 6,300 miles away, the nearly 9-year-old rover Opportunity continues to amaze. The latest analysis of Opportunity data by the rover’s science team adds more evidence that life could have formed on Mars.

Nearly 210 million miles from Earth, Curiosity and Opportunity continue to inspire, educate, and fulfill the scientific promise of their missions.

Read more: CuriousMars: Curiosity's Critical Rock Drilling Target Selected as Opportunity Achieves Major Science Goal – SpaceRef.

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