Cryonics Photos Delve Into the Frozen World of the Immortality Faithful

By Pete Brook
10.04.12
6:30 AM

Life after death, for most people, is a faithful belief in a spiritual hereafter, a transfer to a higher, non-bodily consciousness. For cryonics enthusiasts, however, a “second life” – or more accurately, a resuscitated life with a little help from freezer storage – here on Earth is the goal.

The Prospect of Immortality is a six-year study by UK photographer Murray Ballard, who has traveled the world pulling back the curtain on the amateurs, optimists, businesses and apparatuses of cryonics.

“It’s not a large industry,” says Ballard, who visited the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Phoenix, Arizona; the Cryonics Institute in Detroit, Michigan; KrioRus in Moscow, Russia; and Suspended Animation Inc in Boytan Beach, Florida; among others.

Cryonics is the preservation of deceased humans in liquid nitrogen at temperatures just shy of its boiling point of ?196°C/77 Kelvin. Cryopreservation of humans is not reversible with current science, but cryonicists hypothesize that people who are considered dead by current medical definitions may someday be recovered by using advanced future technologies.

Stats are hard to come by, but it is estimated there are about 2,000 people signed up for cryonics and approximately 250 people currently cryopreserved. Over 100 pets have also been placed in vats of liquid nitrogen with the hopes of a future recovery.

Read more: Cryonics Photos Delve Into the Frozen World of the Immortality Faithful | Raw File | Wired.com.

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