The spores of the Bacillus subtilis (pictured above) have been implemented into a vaccine which is more affordable and safer to administer than injections

Bacterial spores could replace hypodermic needles for vaccinations

By Adam Williams

October 24, 2012

Taking the “ouch” out of injections is a worthy endeavor, but what if they could be avoided entirely? New research conducted at Royal Holloway, University of London offers the hope of achieving just this, by using a bacterium to deliver a vaccine which can be administered via nasal spray, oral liquid, capsule, or small soluble film placed under the tongue, thus reducing the risk of spreading infectious diseases like HIV.

The research, led by Professor Simon Cutting from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, was conducted with the use of pro-biotic spores taken from the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, which Cutting cites as ideal vehicles for carrying antigens and promoting an immune response in the patient.

Read more: Bacterial spores could replace hypodermic needles for vaccinations –gizmag.

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