Analog to digital converter research improves Internet speeds to 100 Gb/second

February 28, 2013

(Phys.org)—Scientists from IBM Research and Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland unveiled a technological achievement in signal conversion technology that can improve Internet speeds to 100 Gigabits per second (Gb/s), doubling current technology on the market today. The research was presented at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) on February 20.

The annual growth rate of structured and unstructured Big Data is 60 percent. A large portion of this is real world data from the environment, including images, light, sound and even the radio signals from the Big Bang 13 billion years ago—and it’s all analog.

To make use of this data in computers the analog signal needs to be converted to digital, in the form of zeros and ones. This is done using an analog to digital converter or ADC, which approximates the right combination of zeros and ones to digitally create the data. For example, the sound of automobiles driving on a highway may be represented as “00100110001100100″.

With the rapid growth of Big Data and the Internet of Things, several years ago IBM scientists began developing energy efficient ADCs to bring large numbers of real world analog signals on logic chips for computation.

Read more: Analog to digital converter research improves Internet speeds to 100 Gb/second — phys.org.

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